Belorussova S. Religion in the Virtual Space

S. Belorussova
Peter the Great Museum of Anthropology and Ethnography
(the Kunstkamera) of the Russian Academy of Sciences
St. Petersburg, Russian Federation
ORCID: 0000-0002-2069-3452
E-mail: svetlana-90@yandex.ru

 

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ABSTRACT. Religion and the Internet came into contact in the early 1980s, when Christian communities began to unite in chat rooms, groups, and forums to discuss various aspects (topics) of the creed. Subsequently, religion has experienced several waves of transformations in its perception of the virtual world. While new religious movements enthusiastically accepted the emergence of online space, traditional communities reacted to the rise of the Internet ambiguously. On the one hand, the network provided a new platform for implementing spiritual practices, attracting audiences, and preaching; on the other hand, virtuality concealed uncertainty and even a threat to undermine religious knowledge. Today, online positioning not only does not cause criticism, but is also actively promoted by the clergy. Thus, critics of virtuality find themselves in the minority and become almost exiles in their own communities. Digital religion is rapidly developing: what in the past seemed unacceptable for the faith may become its quite foreseeable future.

 

 KEYWORDS: religion online, ritual online, church online, cyber religion, digital religion, pandemic, Orthodoxy

 

DOI 10.31250/2618-8600-2021-4(14)-94-118
УДК 271.2:004.738.5

 

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